Heard about Wild Bat Coffee?
01/11/2016

How does coffee become Bat Coffee? Well, the bats feed on the coffee cherries but, unlike the famous Kopi Luwak civet cats, the bats are too small to swallow the coffee cherries.

The bats break the skin of the ripe cherry with their teeth, feeding on the cherry pulp and licking the sugar-rich mucilage. The remains of the cherry are left turned almost inside out and the bats natural digestive acid combined with the sun begin a metamorphosis in the beans structure, whilst it is still on the plant.

 

Harvested by hand the sun drying process is then carefully completed.

 

This is the first time that this type of Bat Coffee is offered anywhere in the world and we are super excited to have it in Cafeoteca for you to enjoy!

 

It is a very special result of the combination of two coffee processing methods, as well as the discriminating selection of the ripest cherries by the bats that makes for a unusual cup.
It has a remarkably fruity and floral taste with a very delicate acidity. The wild ?Artibeus Jamaicensis? bat species emerge from the forests surrounding the Coffea Diversa Garden, in the Brunca region (southernmost region of Costa Rica, close to Panama frontier) using their acute sense of smell to identify the ripest cherries from amongst the incredible cornucopia of coffee on offer.

 

We would highly recommend brewing this coffee through a V60 Decanter to appreciate its fruity appeal

The bats break the skin of the ripe cherry with their teeth, feeding on the cherry pulp and licking the sugar-rich mucilage. The remains of the cherry are left turned almost inside out and the bats natural digestive acid combined with the sun begin a metamorphosis in the beans structure, whilst it is still on the plant.

 

Harvested by hand the sun drying process is then carefully completed.

 

This is the first time that this type of Bat Coffee is offered anywhere in the world and we are super excited to have it in Cafeoteca for you to enjoy!

 

It is a very special result of the combination of two coffee processing methods, as well as the discriminating selection of the ripest cherries by the bats that makes for a unusual cup.
It has a remarkably fruity and floral taste with a very delicate acidity. The wild ?Artibeus Jamaicensis? bat species emerge from the forests surrounding the Coffea Diversa Garden, in the Brunca region (southernmost region of Costa Rica, close to Panama frontier) using their acute sense of smell to identify the ripest cherries from amongst the incredible cornucopia of coffee on offer.